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Professional Development

Recently, you probably invested a lot of time and energy putting together a presentation of your product or service. You crafted your presentation, dotted all the “i”s, crossed all the “t”s, covered all the bases, and answered all of the prospect’s questions. But, instead of a buying decision, you only received a stall, a put-off, or a request for some concession. At whom do you point the finger of blame?

Salespeople invest time developing their pitch, formulating questions, and preparing responses to expected questions and objections from the prospect. They rehearse, refine, and rehearse some more.

How many times have you heard that all you need is good marketing? My marketing clients will tell you it is a vital ingredient in your business. But it cannot often completely replace the skill "selling".

How can goals help you to overcome barriers to success?

Too often we rely on Unique Selling Points to do our work for us. To stand out we have to do something different from the competition

Too often we suffer from "happy ears". Too willing to believe all is agreed

It's too late in the year to do business, right? Wrong. Unless you think so.

The good times have returned to the media world. Or have they? Was it ever easy to win business in this highly competitive industry?

It's often not our fault unless we want to claim success

I often get asked , "Yes but what will my people actually DO in Presidents' Club? A shadow of what learning took place in the room, but here is one of my regular summaries

This is a true story about a lady who was one of the most successful sales people in the team at a software company based in the south of the UK.

Perhaps those you meant to make but didn’t quite get around to? Be honest, do you find there are excuses being developed, considered and accepted as to why we didn’t get there or what will happen next year?

Discover why salespeople fail and what you can do about it.

Are lawyers also salespeople?

If you asked one of them directly, they’d likely scrunch up their face as if they’d just heard an awful verdict from the bench.

But the truth is in this day and age the legal profession is as competitive as any other (if not more so) for new business. Why do you think that every non-profit board contains, at least, one lawyer? It’s likely just not out of the goodness of their collective hearts.

Your meeting date and time has been established. You’re confident your product or service is superior to your competitors. Your goal for the meeting is to convince the prospect. You’ve planned to be there for 45 minutes.

In regards to your business, the expertise you have gained over the years is completely worthless… until someone gives you money for it. If you have a medical doctorate, all you really have is a bunch of student loans until you have patients, and get paid for your knowledge.

Here is the problem: 99% of people out there are already doing what they think is in their best interest. Of course, there’s the 1% who hate themselves and are self-sabotaging, but for the most part, you are probably doing right now, what you think is best. But why is that a problem?

Well, if you want to achieve a higher level of success or happiness, no matter your current level, you are going to run into a problem.

David Sandler found three areas where people get stuck in their growth and development: Attitude, Behaviour, Technique

Over time, every successful salesperson comes to the conclusion that having the proper selling posture during the sales interview is critical. Many sales people are still struggling to understand this concept.

When we talk about posture, we are talking about the attitude reflected in the communication of the salesperson. We know that the message we send in our communication is made up of our body language, our tonality, and our words. However, how we mix those three elements creates a particular attitude that is palpable to our receiver.

There are three primary language postures.

In the theatre, the “fourth wall” is the wall between the actors and the audience. Behind this wall, the world of the actors is exactly as the audience imagines it. The good guys and the bad guys all fit within the story being told. If the fourth wall is “broken” the audience is directly acknowledged theThe Fourth Wall of Business management spell is broken. Once broken, the fourth wall is hard to reconstruct and the audience may not be happy. Think of Jean Valjean in Les Miserables during first act, turning to the audience and speaking in a normal, loud Brooklyn accent, “Yo, could you get off the cell phone? I’m trying to work here!”

In today’s environment, we have to stop acting and looking like beggars with briefcases and begin to recognise that the name of the game is taking business away from our competitors. Let the others wrestle it out at the procurement department and with the low-level influencers.