Skip to main content
(Southern Counties) | pglynn@sandler.com
 

This website uses cookies to offer you a better browsing experience.

Customer Relationships

It might seem a strange question. Whoever is responsible for your sales is looking after all your clients. Or client services are. Or somebody trustworthy in your organisation. However, for many that’s not quite the case.

 

I spend a lot of time explaining to my clients why they should be very slow in sending proposals. The few times I have fallen in the trap have all been disastrous.  

While it may seem pessimistic, having a plan for dealing with a client’s departure is sound advice when it comes to maintaining business and clients. We spend so much time building solid, trusting relationships with clients that it can come as quite a blow when news hits that your client contact announces they’re leaving their current position.

Providing excellent customer service is the best way to generate new business. Here are 15 ways to undermine your business with poor service.

There is often a dilemma with small and growing businesses - they get busy servicing clients, neglect looking for new clients, then end up panicking and looking around for work. It can be a vicious circle – being needy does not leave you in the best mindset to build your client base with the ‘right’ sort of clients.

Do you sometimes think that some people seem to be “lucky” and work drops onto their plate? Do you wish that your phone would ring with new customers more often – as it seems like your friends phones do?

A mistake too many salespeople make is not keeping in touch with former clients. It’s not uncommon for past clients to come to a point where they need your product or service again but don’t remember how to get in touch with you. They are more likely to have your competitors’ information handy.

(Your competitors are still calling on your client even though you are not).

A prospect has agreed to meet with you and indicated they are genuinely interested in your product or service. You arrive at the meeting and spend 40 minutes with the prospect sharing how your product can solve their problems, which they've just shared with you. They are very impressed with you and all the features and benefits that you've shared... They're happy with the delivery timelines, the after sales service that will be provided and once you send the proposal with the price they're sure they can get the rest of the committee to agree to move forward

If your sales objective is to make the sale regardless, get the biggest order possible and structure the best deal for your company, then your entire focus is really on you.

As a sales trainer with Sandler Training, I spend a lot of time talking to my clients and I get paid to work with them in four areas of their business: Strategy, Structure, Staff and Skills. Because I spend hours talking to them, I learn quite a bit. And despite that fact, they still manage to surprise me with the questions they ask me.

Imagine walking into a prospect’s office and having him or her say, “I have a problem. There is a monkey on my back and I want to make it yours.” Any normal person would know better than to say, “Great, toss that over here and let me add that to the monkeys I am already working with.” As a sales coach, I spend time with quite a few people who have big monkey collections. They have accepted that their prospects and clients’ problems are actually theirs. Unfortunately, these monkey collections have some predictable consequences.